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 Being stared at/Staring

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regmelocco



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1PostSubject: Being stared at/Staring   Tue Nov 22, 2016 8:55 am

I have some personal experience over the years with this, and recently my Guides suggested that this was a very important topic to explore.
Not only have I seen many instances of people reacting to being stared at when they had their backs (women especially), when no sensory clues could be normally identified... as I'm sure all of us have.

In recent years I have been wondering about why people walking in this typically sparse European crowd, or in stores/shops or public transport seem to bump into me or touch me inadvertently harshly in contrast to local norms. (It might be OK in some exotic cultures I've read but it is not the norm here). Usually they apologize with a few words or a gesture. And I do not mean drunks, very old or impaired people, some of whom will have a lowered sense of their environment.
Another thing was that when in walking I tried to overtake someone, I would mostly feel that I was far less perceivable at times than other people. True, I have a supersensitive sense of hearing - I usually sleep with earplugs - verified by doctors' examinations when I wsa drafted to the Army here already. It runs in the family.

Then one day I tried something which I have tried at the threshold of consciousness many times earlier - e.g. when trying to move very quickly in a crowd at the Metro (Budapest underground), but never believed in it. While walking quickly among commuters getting off the train here, I tried to concentrate on people - oncomers or when I tried to pass someone much slower. (I am a quick walker and have very long legs.) I simply got tired of being swept to the absolute edge on a daily basis. Sometimes they would react to my dog on a leash before noticing me. (As a recent biker, I try to softly ring the bell to warn people every time because walkers hate being suddenly biked on...)

The thought I held at a nonverbal level was merely that I would go on in a certain direction - watch out! And after that, there could be still quick nonverbal balances worked out and variables for age, being affected by alcohol or in a heated argument or whatever. Plus there are born bullies who would sometimes bump int you because they act like they own the whole place. Now in urban areas of Hungary, most oncoming people will only glance at you for a very brief split second or not at all. It is rare for people to actually bump.

My experience was that if I concentrated hard enough while walking and juggling people, actually staring for a little longer anywhere where I assessed that an oncoming person would rather bump into me, or someone walking in front of me would not let me pass, they would conform to my visualized expectation of a fair movement, otherwise I was again like some wild deer or whatever from their point of view. I tried switching this on and off. It works. It is slightly different with people whose back is towards me than oncoming people who are sometimes ready for a brief conflict for space.

Then I saw my father, whom I haven't seen for several months. He is an ageing hyperconservative artist, who I think has some hidden psychic capabilities which he masks by all this negative obsession with politics, and he kept on explaining about how (figural) sculptures and pictures were "staring" at you and how some people - he referred to the vandals who broke sculptures, or the Russian soldiers occupying the country after World War Two, who holed the eyes of some paintings hung in the family living room for fun. He had a point.

After my meditation practice I noticed already decades ago that sometimes people would fail to note my presence in a room where I would normally be noticed.

My Guides conveyed to me that for years now I have semi-consciously tried to be much less noticeable, so if I wanted to be noticed I had to concentrate on it. I had thought this was an abstract thing - my political, spiritual and other pursuits warranted it - just like I have removed many items of personal data online, refuse to act in YouTube videos and use a fake name and birthdate on Facebook.

The vista opening before me was more interesting to contemplate - that this was a very general but overlooked part of human life, as relevant to everyday life as the unconscious when Freud discovered it, and that it was part of the larger scheme of human power systems. My beliefs obviously incite me towards mistrusting most kinds of political power and hence my overall "hiding" feeling.

There are many more interesting aspects that tie here - this is the very few venues I shared my study here. Briefly, I would use the term "personal power" in a very abstract sense to this. Now that has a different perspective when you start to contemplate it in a general scale...

If you wish, you could consult British biologist Rupert Sheldrake's partial research here: Being stared at
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2PostSubject: Re: Being stared at/Staring   Tue Nov 22, 2016 10:01 am

My first reaction to reading #1 was that we all live in the reality we visualize first and the reality others visualize second. The more powerfully we visual what we intend to do, the more likely it is that others will allow us to do it.

My second reaction was that you dealt mostly with visual phenomena, but everything you speculated about also applies to auditory phenomena. For example, I often "know" what someone is going to say before they say it, even when it's not what I'm expecting them to say.

And my final reaction was that walking around in public silently chanting a mantram or performing other "magical" actions internally causes the people around me to act differently than they do when I'm not. I'd like your comments on how this ties in with what you wrote above.
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regmelocco



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3PostSubject: Re: Being stared at/Staring   Tue Nov 22, 2016 5:55 pm

I often try to silence my internal dialogue, by several methods. Remembering a piece of music, a mantram or externalizing it while I'm listening to talk radio - I'm not the one who's talking so it's actually good to stop internal dialogues.

Some mantrams I learned, like the Maha-Mrityunjaya mantra just pop up silently when I'm walking or commuting - then again it's a non-ego center and a magical focus. It seems to affect people, but frequently the best is total silence at a given short moment of "staring people off the sidewalk."

I've read theories - e.g. about the famous book Psychic Discoveries Behind the Iron Curtain - that said there is a left-whirring spiral of energy when people are receptively telepathic, and a right-whirling cloud when they are influencing others. This may sound simplistic but definitely there is a yin-yang feeling and these days I'm tryin to do both, not at the same time though.

In my walking experiments, I have to be extra attuned to people and then I do something which is like the act of staring - and I have no doubt that the same can be done auditorily. There are many different qualities and textures of silence. Some build a bubble around you without effort. Some can be pushed out - I think some of the feats of Chinese martial art masters pushing people away by thought is real though. The thing is, my friend who is an expert on arts of suggestion still shakes his head, but he'd stop shaking he were to see and witness my walkway experiences...
Sheldrake proves by painstaking experiments that people in staring experiments do not have sensory cues. The only problem is the experimenters say that after a few minutes it starts to be boring and then it's no longer as effective either.
I would rather use a single mantram in such quick situations. In fact, I hve already been looking at ways to protect me from violent or even loudly argumentative people, that's how I started... Inner silence is a prerequisite, if just for a few minutes. And mantrams are the ideal ways to stop the chatter in our heads.
Another thing is when I attune to my dog. Obviously, this needs a different sense as talking and signals are very limited. Sometimes I think she transmit a thought or where she wants me to turn with leash, sometimes the opposite. dogs are great for psychic training.
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4PostSubject: Re: Being stared at/Staring   Tue Nov 22, 2016 9:03 pm

reg, #3

reg said: I often try to silence my internal dialogue, by several methods. Remembering a piece of music, a mantram or externalizing it while I'm listening to talk radio - I'm not the one who's talking so it's actually good to stop internal dialogues.
RR's reply: I've been able to silence my internal dialogue with a simple act of will ever since I "woke up" in 1946. I tried to describe the process in WiH with limited success, because there's no simple answer. The material about achieving a "psychic trance" instead of a "hypnotic trance" was an attempt to do this. The key is "reaching up, not down". In other words, achieving a state of consciousness that has MORE self-awareness than normal consciousness, rather than less as is the case with all of the different kinds of hypnotic trances.

reg said: Some mantrams I learned, like the Maha-Mrityunjaya mantra just pop up silently when I'm walking or commuting - then again it's a non-ego center and a magical focus. It seems to affect people, but frequently the best is total silence at a given short moment of "staring people off the sidewalk."
RR's reply: A simple "Om Nama Shivay(a)" works very well for me. Either it works by itself as you just described, or else it bounces me to another part of the Shiva Lingam evocations that's more appropriate.

reg said: I've read theories - e.g. about the famous book Psychic Discoveries Behind the Iron Curtain - that said there is a left-whirring spiral of energy when people are receptively telepathic, and a right-whirling cloud when they are influencing others. This may sound simplistic but definitely there is a yin-yang feeling and these days I'm tryin to do both, not at the same time though.

RR's reply: I've read this item of theory in many different treatises on occultism, both Western and Eastern, but I tend to see it as an over-simplification like the related left-brain/right-brain theories. IMO, the reality is closer to "Shakti stands on Shiva's left, but she is really the active element whereas he is the passive element".

reg: In my walking experiments, I have to be extra attuned to people and then I do something which is like the act of staring - and I have no doubt that the same can be done auditorily. There are many different qualities and textures of silence. Some build a bubble around you without effort. Some can be pushed out - I think some of the feats of Chinese martial art masters pushing people away by thought is real though. The thing is, my friend who is an expert on arts of suggestion still shakes his head, but he'd stop shaking he were to see and witness my walkway experiences...
RR's reply: I've been doing everything you just described all my life, and IMO, being able to do these things is the default mode for the operation of human consciousness. Babies are born able to them, but forget during the process of learning to talk and understand the speech of others.

reg said: Sheldrake proves by painstaking experiments that people in staring experiments do not have sensory cues. The only problem is the experimenters say that after a few minutes it starts to be boring and then it's no longer as effective either.
RR's reply: IMO, this is the difference between a "trained psychic" and everyone else. It's a matter of being able to transcend the boredom and slip into a desired state of consciousness with an act of will. This is easy to understand after you learn how to do it, but incomprehensible before.

reg said: I would rather use a single mantram in such quick situations. In fact, I hve already been looking at ways to protect me from violent or even loudly argumentative people, that's how I started... Inner silence is a prerequisite, if just for a few minutes. And mantrams are the ideal ways to stop the chatter in our heads.
RR's reply: My Guides told me this when I first started studying "magick" seriously, by steering me away from the Western Occultism I grew up around and into the Shaivite Hindu practices that both of us rely on heavily today.

reg said: Another thing is when I attune to my dog. Obviously, this needs a different sense as talking and signals are very limited. Sometimes I think she transmit a thought or where she wants me to turn with leash, sometimes the opposite. dogs are great for psychic training.
RR's reply: I've done a lot psychic training practice while walking dogs or riding horses, simply because their responses are "purer" than those of human beings, trained or untrained. They apparently have less surface baggage in their minds than humans normally have.
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